Tag Archives: nutrition

A banana may boost eye health!

It is time we change the old adage, for a banana a day may keep blindness away. Eating a banana daily is likely to boost eye health and prevent vision-related diseases, a study has found.

Researchers have found that bananas have carotenoid — a compound that turn fruits and vegetables red, orange or yellow and are converted into vitamin A, important precursors for eye health — in the liver.

According to previous research, foods containing high levels of carotenoids also protect against chronic disease, including certain cancers, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The study showed that banana rich in provitamin A carotenoids may offer a potential food source for alleviating vitamin A deficiency — important for sight.

To combat vitamin A deficiency, researchers have been investigating methods to boost carotenoids in bananas. Cara L. Mortimer and other researchers from Queensland University of Technology in Australia studied two banana varieties to find out why they make very different amounts of carotenoids. They found that the pale yellow, low-carotenoid cavendish variety produces more of an enzyme that breaks down carotenoids.

In addition, another variety stashes its carotenoids in microscopic sacs during ripening, shifting the chemical equilibrium in the fruit so it can make even higher levels of these substances. The findings, published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, can someday help in the development of banana varieties with enhanced health benefits.

Bananas are ideal food for young children and families for many regions of the world, because of their sweetness, texture, portion size, familiarity, availability, convenience, versatility and cost.

Leafy Greens, Every Day, May Keep Glaucoma Away

New research indicates that leafy greens may be even healthier than we thought. While veggies like spinach, kale and collard greens may not be able to cure glaucoma, eating them regularly may help protect you against ever developing the most common form of the disease, known as primary open angle glaucoma (POAG).

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School followed more than 100,000 men and women who were enrolled in two major medical studies for a period of more than 28 years. Everyone in these studies was 40 years or older, and none had glaucoma at the start of the study.

Kale

The patients received eye exams every two years, and throughout the course of the studies, 1,483 people developed POAG. When the researchers looked at the diets of the study participants, they noted a strong similarity among those who did not develop glaucoma — these people ate more leafy greens. In fact, greater intake of green leafy vegetables was associated with a 20 percent to 30 percent lower risk of POAG.

The association was even stronger for POAG with early paracentral visual field loss, a common subtype of POAG. The research revealed that people who ate a lot of leafy greens had a 40 percent to 50 percent lower risk of acquiring this form of the disease.

The reason these super foods offer such great protection is related to the dietary nitrate they contain. It’s thought that glaucoma impairs blood flow to the optic nerve. Nitric oxide helps regulate this flow. Since leafy greens contain high levels of nitrates, the precursor to nitric oxide, consuming them likely keeps things running more smoothly.

A significant amount of other new research is currently aimed at developing therapeutics that treat glaucoma by way of nitric oxide. In fact, the FDA is reviewing at least one new medication that donates nitric oxide. But thanks to this latest report, far fewer people will need it if they load up on leafy greens before any glaucomatous damage is done.

So just how much roughage do you need to eat to protect yourself from glaucoma? In this study, those who consumed the most leafy greens averaged about 1.5 servings per day, which equates to about one and a half cups.

The study was published in JAMA Ophthalmology this month — A.H.

This article was originally published on the All About Vision website.

Good Nutrition Important For Eye Health As You Age

Poor vision has many causes and treatments, and as you grow older, you will likely experience some type of vision loss or reduction in visual performance.

For older adults, bright lights, glare while driving at night and even blindness can dramatically affect quality of life, but the treatment isn’t just glasses or a stronger prescription – it’s also nutrition and supplementation.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness for Americans older than 60, according to the American Optometric Association. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 7.3 million people are at substantial risk for vision loss from AMD. Other estimates indicate that as our population continues to rapidly age, as many as one in three could be diagnosed with AMD in the next 20 years.

AMD deteriorates central vision, affecting everything from seeing faces clearly to literally having no central vision at all. Key risk factors for AMD are age, family history, smoking (past or present), low macular pigment, light skin and eyes, obesity and Caucasian women are also at slightly higher risk.

Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD) is a brief, non-intrusive exam performed by many optometrists throughout the country, which measures macular pigment in the back of the eye.

Think of macular pigment as “internal sunglasses” for the back of your eye – they absorb harmful blue light that can adversely affect eye health. Internal sunglasses protect the photoreceptors in the back of the eye – specifically the cones, which are responsible for central vision, color, sharpness and sensitivity to bright light, among others. Two key carotenoids, Zeaxanthin (zee-uh-zan-thin) and Lutein, comprise the internal sunglasses, which can become thin as we age, unable to block or absorb harmful blue light. In order to keep the internal sunglasses thick and dense, it is important to replenish Zeaxanthin, the predominant carotenoid in the area where the concentration of cones is the highest.

Zeaxanthin is very scarce in the average daily diet, and vegetables like kale, corn, collard greens, spinach, and peppers naturally provide nutrients to help maintain macular health, but supplementation is often necessary. For example, one would have to eat approximately 20 ears of corn to get a recommended dosage of 8 to 10 milligrams of natural dietary Zeaxanthin per day.

Supplements like the EyePromise brand of eye vitamins help rebuild macular pigment through unique nutritional formulas that feature the highest levels of all natural Zeaxanthin, derived from paprika. In addition to protection, Zeaxanthin and Lutein can improve visual performance, reduce glare issues and sensitivity to bright light, as well as improve color intensity and contrast sensitivity.

“Too often we concentrate our diets on weight, blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure, but ignore one of the most important organs in our bodies – our eyes,” says Dr. Dennis Giehart, founder of Zeavision. “An abundance of science has found low macular pigment puts people at risk for AMD, and increasing Zeaxanthin in the diet can help improve macular pigment for improved visual performance.”

Vision shouldn’t be something you take for granted as you age. Take care of your eyes with proper nutrition and supplementation if necessary, and ask your eye care professional about having your macular pigment measured to maintain your central vision

Column Connects Benefits Of Food To Body Parts

The Washington Post Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (9/14, Huget) in its “Eat, Drink & Be Healthy” column lists some foods and health benefits according to body parts. Egg yolks and yellow corn aid the eyes because “carotenoids that give fruits and vegetables their color, may help ward off age-related macular degeneration.” The article mentions foods that benefit the brain (salmon, tuna, sardines); bones (milk, fortified soy beverages); heart (baked potato, prune juice); lungs (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok choy); stomach (ginger); colon (beans and peas); prostate (green tea); ovaries (ice cream) and mentions the relevant study and why the respective foods may have the beneficial effects.

Diet Rich In Nuts, Soy May Help Reduce LDL Cholesterol

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/24, Hellmich) reports that while “nutrition experts have known for years that some foods, such as oatmeal, nuts and soy products, lower cholesterol,” but new research “shows that a diet with several of these foods can decrease LDL (bad) cholesterol significantly.”

The Wall Street Journal Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/24, Wang, Subscription Publication) reports that the study Share to FacebookShare to Twitter, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, provides more proof that simply reducing dietary fat may not be the best way to boost one’s heart health.

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (8/24, Healy) reports that for the “study tested a diet that contained a portfolio of cholesterol-fighting foods such as soy protein, nuts, ‘sticky’ fiber such as that found in oats and barley, and plant sterols.” The 345 participants, all of whom had high cholesterol, “each followed one of three diets: an ‘intensive portfolio’ diet, a ‘routine portfolio’ diet, or a high-fiber, low-saturated-fat diet rich in produce and whole grains.” Of “the 267 subjects who completed the trial, all three groups lost roughly an equal amount of weight,” but participants “on one of the portfolio diets – intensive or routine – saw their LDL cholesterol levels decline between 13.1% and 13.8% after six months,” compared to the 3% decline in LDL levels seen in those on the high-fiber, low-saturated-fat diet.

The Importance of Phytochemicals in Your Diet

Phytochemicals, are naturally found in plants and are responsible for providing color, flavor, and aroma to fruits and vegetables. They are biologically active and function to protect plants against invasion, disease, and infection. Studies have shown that high intakes of fruits and vegetables are correlated with lower risks of chronic disease and obesity, partly because of these phytochemicals, also called phytonutrients. You know those antioxidants you hear about so often? Phytochemicals contain lots of them. Phytochemicals are broken into different classes which include (and are not limited to): flavonoids, carotenoids, chlorophyll, and isothyocynates. What are these you ask? Read on:

Flavonoids are a class of phytochemicals found in plant pigments that has been said to act as an antioxidant, enhance effects of vitamin C and strengthen cell tissues. Today, one of the most talked about flavonoids is quercetin.

Quercetin is found in apples, onions, citrus fruits, berries, red grapes, broccoli, cocoa, and tea. It may not only protect us against heart disease and cancer, but according to recent research, it may increase endurance for people who are beginning exercise regimens. It may not work as effectively in trained athletes.

Carotenoids are class of phytochemicals with more than 600 naturally occurring pigments synthesized by plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria. Carotenoids are found in the most richly colored yellow, orange, and red fruits and vegetables like pumpkin, tomatoes, tangerines, cantaloupe, carrots, squash, and watermelons. Carontenoids are known for their high antioxidant properties and protective effects against certain cancers, like prostate. Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxathin are the most common dietary carotenoids. Beta-carotene found in carrots and other fruits and veggies can be converted to retinol which is a pre-cursor to vitamin A which is important for maintaining eyehealth. For some of these foods, cooking and chopping may increase the availability and enhance their beneficial effects.

Chlorophyll is a class of phytochemicals that is responsible for giving plants their green pigment. Studies have found that chlorophyll has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and wound-healing properties. Foods that are high in chlorophyll are easy to spot—you know, the ones kids say “Yuck!” to—spinach, broccoli, green beans, arugla, and endive. I say YUM!

Isothyocynates are a class of phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables like bok choy, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, mustard, radish, and watercress. These vegetables are rich sources of glucosinolate, the precursor to isothiocynates.. Research indicates that increased intake of isothyoncynates may inhibit cancer cell growth and cause cells to die. To maintain high levels of this phytochemical you really want to reduce cooking time and use minimal amounts of liquid because glucosinolate is leeched into water. The best way to absorb the phytochemicals in these foods is to eat them raw or to use cooking techniques like steaming or microwaving.

By Tanya Zuckerbrot

VNTV Episode #5 – Nutrition and the Eyes Part Two with Dr. Hoang Ho, OD

Filmed on July 8th, 2011, we finished our discussion on the proper supplementation to insure great eye health and overall physical health. Our emphasis was on strong anti-oxidants that help the body rid of free radicals which can cause cancer and other degenerative diseases. We also went into detail about diabetic retinopathy caused by diabetes, macular degeneration, and glaucoma, discussing why OPC-3 and omega 3 fish oils are considered extremely potent agents. There is a huge variance in quality when it comes to these products especially the fish oils so we will recommend the very best.

What Makes nutraMetrix Isotonix OPC-3® Unique?

nutraMetrix Isotonix OPC-3® is an isotonic-capable food supplement that is made from a combination of bilberry, grape seed, red wine and pine bark extracts, and citrus extract bioflavonoids, all found to be powerful antioxidants. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) are bioflavonoids (complex organic plant compounds) found in fruits, vegetables and certain tree barks that provide exceptional nutritional benefits to the human body. Studies have shown OPCs to be up to 20 times more powerful than vitamin C and 50 times more powerful than vitamin E in neutralizing free radicals. nutraMetrix Isotonix OPC-3 contains the only isotonic form of Pycnogenol® in the world. Pycnogenol is a natural plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree and the most clinically researched and potent bioflavonoid.*

Isotonic, which means “same pressure,” bears the same chemical resemblance of the body’s blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body’s common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body’s metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix® dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do to in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.

What Makes Heart Health™ Essential Omega III Fish Oil with Vitamin E Unique?

Heart Health Essential Omega III with Vitamin E is a superior product due to a number of factors. The best fish are used to produce a clean and safe product that is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It also contains 3000mg of fish oil where most other commercial products contain a third of the total fish oil contained in Heart Health Essential Omega III. Heart Health Essential Omega III comes from small fish where other competitive products use large fish which are more likely to accumulate toxins. Heart Health Essential Omega III provides a high quality, high purity product with significant percentages of the health promoting EPA and DHA.

The fish oil in Heart Health Essential Omega III with Vitamin E comes from sardines and anchovies harvested off the coast of Peru. Not only do anchovies and sardines have a high omega III content, they also have high percentages of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Anchovies and sardines have a short lifecycle making them an ideal source of fish oil because they are less prone to accumulating environmental toxins that can be found in larger, longer-lived fish. Contaminants are generally low in sardines and anchovies even before they go through an intense purification process. Every batch of fish oil is hand selected and tested prior to processing by our manufacturer and must pass more than 200 quality checks during the production process.

Recent research has shown that that fish oil may be beneficial in supporting cognitive function by helping the body manage stress and enhance mood. It may also promote a healthy complexion. In an article published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the effects of Omega-3 Fish oil supplementation was shown to be beneficial for healthy cognitive and cardiac functioning. The study shows that supplementing with fish oil daily can rapidly raise the levels of EPA and DHA in cardiac tissue. This is important because both EPA and DHA have been proven to help maintain normal plasma triglycerides. In addition, DHA has been shown to help maintain blood pressure and blood viscosity. This study also showed an inverse relationship between EPA/DHA and arachidonic acid (AA), an omega-6 fatty acid. As EPA and DHA increased in atrial (heart tissue) phospholipids, AA decreased.1

Heart Health™ Essential Omega III Fish Oil with Vitamin E provides the three grams of omega III that studies reveal is the most effective amount to promote overall cardiovascular health. Fish oils have been clinically demonstrated to provide a host of benefits that successfully promote cardiovascular health. Essential Omega III Fish Oil helps maintain normal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, promotes healthy blood pressure levels, helps maintain healthy levels of C-reactive protein, helps maintain normal blood flow and helps enhance mood. The fish oil used in Essential Omega III is tested twice, once by the manufacturer and then by an independent testing company for mercury, lead, PCB, and other heavy metals. Both tests confirm that Heart Health Essential Omega III Fish Oil is free of mercury, lead, PCPs, and other heavy metals. We only use fish oil that meets or exceeds standards set by Canada (CFIA), the European Union (EU) and the United States (CRN).*

Poor cardiovascular health is one of the leading causes of death and illness in the United States, accounting for one out of every two deaths in both men and women. Poor cardiovascular health is becoming a worldwide epidemic. An unhealthy diet of processed, high-calorie, high-fat foods, pollution, smoking and sedentary lifestyles all contribute to poor heart health. Not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, exercising regularly and taking the right supplements can all contribute to promoting good cardiovascular health. Clinical trials have shown that supplementing with omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish oil) may help to maintain normal levels of triglycerides and cholesterol, support healthy blood pressure and promote normal platelet activity.*

Click Here For More Information


Diet May Be Key First Line Therapy In New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes

HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Preidt) reported, “Dietary changes alone can yield the same benefits as changes in both diet and exercise in the first year after a person is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes,” according to research Share to FacebookShare to Twitter presented at the American Diabetes Association’s annual meeting and simultaneously published online June 25 in The Lancet. Investigators “found that patients who were encouraged to lose weight by modifying their diet with the help of a dietician had the same improvements in blood sugar (glycemic) control, weight loss, cholesterol and triglyceride levels as those who changed both their diet and physical activity levels (30 minutes of brisk walking five times a week).”

The study’s lead author “said the findings may also suggest a change in treatment algorithm in type 2 diabetes, with diet as the first line therapy, then a combination of diet and exercise, and finally diet plus activity and metformin if the two prior approaches fail,” MedPage Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/25, Fiore) reported. But, “in an accompanying comment Share to FacebookShare to Twitter, Frank Hu, MD, of Harvard School of Public Health, wrote that the results do not necessarily mean that an increase in physical activity is ineffective for diabetes management.” Hu wrote, “It is possible that modification of two complex behaviors at the same time is no more effective than a change in one.” Medscape Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Canavan) also covered the story.

Curbing Calories Key Ingredient For Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetes. HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/26, Mozes) reported, “Curbing calories is the key ingredient for diabetics seeking to lose weight, and low-fat diets that are either high in protein or high in carbs are equally effective,” according to research presented yesterday at the American Diabetes Association’s annual meeting. After following about nearly 300 overweight, middle-aged or senior “men and women with type 2 diabetes who were on a new, two-year nutritional program” and randomizing them with to a low-fat/high-carbohydrate group or to a low-fat/high-protein group, researchers found that in the end, “both groups lost a similar amount of weight and reduced their waist size in similar measure.”

 

Does healthy eating cost you more?

One of the biggest myths out there is the myth that eating healthy costs too much.

Just the opposite… and I’ll prove it to you in three ways.

#1:  Cash

Here’s some sample figures courtesy of Scott Tousignant’s fitness blog…

:  2 medium size sweet potatoes $1 or… small fries from a fast food joint

:  2 red peppers $1 or… a can of pop

:  Bowl of oatmeal with fruit & protein powder $2 or… large bag of chips

:  6 Chicken Breasts $10 or… a sub combo from a fast food joint

:  18 eggs $3.50 or… a burger from a fast food joint

:  2 salmon fillets $15 or… large pizza

:  Loaded chicken salad (homemade) $3 or… bag of cookies

:  Large bag of oatmeal $3.50 or… 4 chocolate bars

Not much of a comparison, it is?

Yet the foods on the left would feed a family of two or more for 4-7 days… the foods on the right? 2-3 days if you live through it.

Tips to make the most expensive part of eating healthy — the cost of quality meats — go further include…

1. Use tofu fillers in chicken and beef recipes. Even if you hate tofu, you can barely taste the difference when combined properly.

2. Buy your meats in bulk online. You can find less expensive grass-fed beef and naturally-raised chicken and have it delivered to you if you live near a large city. If not, check the local farmers.

3. Eat meat only 3-4 times per week and use black beans with rice or inexpensive tuna for your other days. I eat tuna cooked in a skillet with lots of veggies and some olive oil almost every night and I LOVE the taste!

Jon Benson’s book The Every Other Day Dietplan ( http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/eodd) has over 40 pages of recipes in it to help you eat healthy and cheap… and you can still eat out and consume your favorite foods several times per week.

#2:  Your Health

Do we ‘really’ need to talk about buy new (usually larger) clothes every year or two? Or about the health care costs associated with being even 20 pounds over your ideal weight, let alone more? How about the time you miss from work with excessive colds?

Eating healthy and taking care of your body adds years to your life… and for the record, the years eating poorly takes away from your life, on average, costs each American over 80,000 in medical expenses.

Want to add that to your food budget?

#3: The Big Picture

Anyone who has been fit knows the joy it brings… the freedom you feel from wearing whatever you want… the productivity you see from increased energy… the pace at which you move during the day.

Not only are these gifts priceless, but they are also massive cash-savers. Your productivity alone can add thousands to your bottom line each year, well off-setting any costs associated with eating quality food.

The Bottom Line…

Like any good accountant would suggest, you need to look at your ROI (return on in.vest.ment) if nothing else.

What does in.vest.ing in a better body, greater health, and vibrant energy do for your life? How can that actually translate into more in.come AND less expense?

You will be surprised.

Sincerely,

Khoa

P.S.  If you want some tips on getting started with shedding that excess weight… go here for a short video… and prepare to take some notes! …

it’s freee….

http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/eodd; <— click.here

New Food Pyramid Coming June 2, USDA Says

May 26, 2011 — In an exclusive interview with WebMD, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) says the replacement for the Food Pyramid will be announced on June 2 — and that the new icon heralds a “monumental effort” to improve America’s health.

Why a new icon? The pyramid really does not capture the public’s attention anymore, Robert C. Post, PhD, deputy director of the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, tells WebMD.

“Consumers can look forward to a new, simple, easy-to-understand cue to prompt healthy choices,” Post tells WebMD. “You will get this monumental effort across all agencies as well as the private sector. A partnership with the goal of improving the health of all Americans.”

One of the few people who already has seen the icon is WebMD Director of Nutrition Kathleen Zelman, RD.

“This icon really has the potential to trigger an ‘aha!’ moment, where people say, ‘Hey, this is not that hard, I can do this,'” Zelman says. “These ‘aha!’ moments are what make people finally change their behavior.”

The release of the icon marks the launch of a massive effort to promote the USDA/HHS dietary guidelines announced last January.

New Diet Icon Marks New U.S. Health Strategy

You’ll be seeing the icon everywhere. Every relevant federal agency will be doing its part. The White House will play a leading role, coordinating the new USDA/HHS dietary guidelines with Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative.

The old diet plan was to tell Americans what they should eat and hope for the best. The new plan is vastly more active and will reach people at home, at school, at work, at play, and especially at supermarkets and restaurants.

“What we learned is it is not just giving information, it is a matter of making people understand there are options and practical ways to apply this to their lifestyle,” Post says. “There will be a ‘how-to’ that will resonate with individuals. That is the behavioral part that is needed. We need to transcend information — ‘here’s what the science says’ — and give people the tools and the opportunities to take action.”

There are six how-to messages to guide healthy eating:

  • Enjoy your food, but eat less.
  • Avoid oversized portions.
  • Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables.
  • Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk.
  • Compare sodium in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals, and choose the foods with lower numbers.
  • Drink water instead of sugary drinks.

Doing all of this at once may be too much to swallow. So the USDA plan is to stress one idea at a time.

First up will be the “make half of your plate fruits and vegetables” advice. It will be supported by a wide array of guidance on exactly how to do this. For example, one might add fruit to a leafy green salad. Or replace a sugary dessert with a bowl of fruit.

Post notes that the government can’t do this alone. Key to the plan is a myriad of private/public partnerships with a wide variety of businesses ranging from grocery to media companies.

“The fact they are reaching out to a broad partnership is important, because we need all the ammunition we can get to fight the epidemics of obesity and diabetes,” Zelman says.

~Daniel DeNoon

SOURCES:

Robert C. Post, PhD, deputy director, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, USDA.

Kathleen Zelman, RD, director of nutrition, WebMD.

USDA and HHS, 2010 Dietary Guidelines, released Jan. 31, 2011.

 

VNTV Episode 3 – Nutrition and the Eyes with special guest Dr. Hoang Ho, OD

We filmed our third episode for VietNewsTV on Friday May 6. Our special guest was Dr. Hoang Ho, who is the owner/optometrist of Healthy I Care Optometry located inside the Walmart in the Clairemont area.

This is the brief outline of topics that was discussed
Dry eyes:  Artificial tears and Omega 3 fatty acid.

Cornea:  Arcus by hypercholesteremia.

Lens:  cataract prevention

Vitreous:  PVD

Retina:  Supplements for ARMD, Glaucoma, DM, HTN, and other supportive components for normal healthy tissues.

An emphasis on OPC-3 will be discussed on the second episode and here is a brief overview.

OPC, a 3-letter acronym for Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins Complex, is commonly known as super antioxidant, 20 times stronger than Vitamin C and 50 times stronger than Vitamin E. An OPC supplement in isotonic form has been proven to be the most effective for absorption in the human body, and to be the most popular in the OPC consumers, if the OPC complex is derived from a combination of 3 natural product extracts – pine bark, grape seed and red wine extracts.
OPC Antioxidants are considered the best antioxidants available to humans. Derived from grape seed extract, pine tree bark and other sources, OPC Antioxidants are a powerful mixture of all natural, free radical neutralizers that provide a plethora of health benefits including increased circulation and blood flow, improved cardiovascular health and improved brain function. It can even help reduce stress, reverse the aging process and offset symptoms and ailments resulting from serious diseases like Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis and Macular Degeneration.

Few Americans Accurately Estimate The Number Of Calories They Should Eat Daily

USA Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/6, Hellmich) reports that just nine percent of Americans “can accurately estimate the number of calories they should eat in a day, and 9% keep track of their calories every day,” according to “a nationally representative online survey of 1,000 people, conducted for the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation.”

WebMD Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/5, Goodman) reported, “At a time of economic uncertainty, however, the survey suggests weight loss may be on the back burner for a lot of people.” Not surprisingly, “taste is the main reason people buy food at the grocery store or a restaurant, but price is catching up as a main consideration.” Although “87% of people report taste is their top priority, 79% made price the No. 2 factor in food and drink decision making — a 15% jump for price since 2006. Healthfulness of food ranked third: 66% said a food’s nutritional quality affected their food choices.”

 

The “Cost” of Eating Healthy


[ Weight loss and body transformation is never easy, but Jon Benson is an expert at making it EASIER. This is today killer article on how to get it done… faster and easier… enjoy! ]

One of the biggest myths out there is the myth that eating healthy costs too much.

Just the opposite… and I’ll prove it to you in three ways.

#1: Cash

Here’s some sample figures courtesy of my friend Scott Tousignant’s fitness blog…

2 medium size sweet potatoes $1 or… small fries from a fast food joint

2 red peppers $1 or… a can of pop

Bowl of oatmeal with fruit & protein powder $2 or… large bag of chips

6 Chicken Breasts $10 or… a sub combo from a fast food joint

18 eggs $3.50 or… a burger from a fast food joint

2 salmon fillets $15 or… large pizza

Loaded chicken salad (homemade) $3 or… bag of cookies

Large bag of oatmeal $3.50 or… 4 chocolate bars

Not much of a comparison, it is?

Yet the foods on the left would feed a family of two or more for 4-7 days… the foods on the right? 2-3 days if you live through it.

Tips to make the most expensive part of eating healthy — the cost of quality meats — go further include…

1. Use tofu fillers in chicken and beef recipes. Even if you hate tofu, you can barely taste the difference when combined properly.

2. Buy your meats in bulk online. You can find less expensive grass-fed beef and naturally-raised chicken and have it delivered to you if you live near a large city. If not, check the local farmers.

3. Eat meat only 3-4 times per week and use black beans with rice or inexpensive tuna for your other days. I eat tuna cooked in a skillet with lots of veggies and some olive oil almost every night and I LOVE the taste!

My book The Every Other Day Diet has over 40 pages of recipes in it to help you eat healthy and cheap… and you can still eat out and consume your favorite foods several times per week.

#2: Your Health

Do we ‘really’ need to talk about buy new (usually larger) clothes every year or two? Or about the health care costs associated with being even 20 pounds over your ideal weight, let alone more? How about the time you miss from work with excessive colds?

Eating healthy and taking care of your body adds years to your life… and for the record, the years eating poorly takes away from your life, on average, costs each American over 80,000 in medical expenses.

Want to add that to your food budget?

#3: The Big Picture

Anyone who has been fit knows the joy it brings… the freedom you feel from wearing whatever you want… the productivity you see from increased energy… the pace at which you move during the day.

Not only are these gifts priceless, but they are also massive cash-savers. Your productivity alone can add thousands to your bottom line each year, well off-setting any costs associated with eating quality food.

The Bottom Line…

Like any good accountant would suggest, you need to look at your ROI (return on investment) if nothing else.

What does investing in a better body, greater health, and vibrant energy do for your life? How can that actually translate into more income AND less expense?

You will be surprised.

Remember:

Don’t Quit. Get Fit!

P.S. If you want some tips on getting started with shedding that excess weight… go here for a short video… and prepare to take some notes! …

it’s freee….

Weight Loss Tips <— click.here

[ I cannot speak highly enough about Jon and his unusual slant on fitness and weight loss. Believe me, they WORK. I hope you enjoyed this post and want to see more. Here’s my tip: jump over to the pages in this article today. Your body will thank you! ]

VNTV Episode 3 – Nutrition and the Eyes

We will be filming our third episode for VietNewsTV this Friday May 6. Our special guest will be Dr. Hoang Ho, who is the owner/optometrist of Healthy I Care Optometry located inside the Walmart in the Clairemont area.

This is the brief outline of topics to be discussed
Dry eyes:  Artificial tears and Omega 3 fatty acid.

Cornea:  Arcus by hypercholesteremia.

Lens:  cataract prevention

Vitreous:  PVD

Retina:  Supplements for ARMD, Glaucoma, DM, HTN, and other supportive components for normal healthy tissues.

An emphasis on OPC-3 will be discussed.

OPC, a 3-letter acronym for Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins Complex, is commonly known as super antioxidant, 20 times stronger than Vitamin C and 50 times stronger than Vitamin E. An OPC supplement in isotonic form has been proven to be the most effective for absorption in the human body, and to be the most popular in the OPC consumers, if the OPC complex is derived from a combination of 3 natural product extracts – pine bark, grape seed and red wine extracts.
OPC Antioxidants are considered the best antioxidants available to humans. Derived from grape seed extract, pine tree bark and other sources, OPC Antioxidants are a powerful mixture of all natural, free radical neutralizers that provide a plethora of health benefits including increased circulation and blood flow, improved cardiovascular health and improved brain function. It can even help reduce stress, reverse the aging process and offset symptoms and ailments resulting from serious diseases like Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis and Macular Degeneration.

High-Fiber Diet May Reduce Lifetime Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease


USA Today (3/23, Hellmich) reports, “A high-fiber diet appears to reduce your lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, especially if you are consuming lots of fiber when you are young and middle-aged,” according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association conference. After analyzing “dietary-recall data from more than 11,000 people, ages 20 and older, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,” researchers found that “people who are in the top 25% of dietary fiber intake — that is, they consume more than 22 grams of dietary fiber a day — are more likely to have a lower lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.” HealthDay (3/22, Dotinga) also covered the story.
Eating Whole Grain Cereal May Reduce Risk For Developing Hypertension. HealthDay (3/22, Reinberg) reported that, according to a study presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association conference, “eating breakfast cereal — especially whole grain cereal — may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure.” After examining “data on 13,368 male doctors who took part in the Physicians Health Study I,” researchers “found about a 20 percent decreased risk of developing hypertension in those who consumed whole grain breakfasts cereals at least seven times a week.”

Number Of Americans With Prediabetes Increasing


The Los Angeles Times (3/21, Worth) reports, “The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released figures in January showing that the number of American adults with prediabetes had jumped from 57 million in 2008 to 79 million in 2010.” At the same time, “the number with full-on diabetes grew from 23.6 million to 26 million, the vast majority of which are type 2 cases.” With changes in diet and exercise, people with prediabetes, which is marked by elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance, can avoid developing type 2 diabetes. But, “without such changes, most people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.”
Elevated Levels Of Five Amino Acids Associated With Development Of Type 2 Diabetes. WebMD (3/20, Warner) reported, “Elevated levels of a group of five amino acids may predict the development of diabetes years before any noticeable symptoms occur,” according to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine. After following 2,422 adults for 12 years, “researchers found that blood tests that screened for these amino acids accurately predicted risk of type 2 diabetes in otherwise healthy adults as well as in those with traditional risk factors, such as obesity.” Notably, “elevated levels of five amino acids, isoleucine, leucine, valine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine, were associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.” The UK’s Daily Mail (3/21, Derbyshire) and the UK’s Independent (3/21, O’Connor) also cover the story.