Tag Archives: hypertension

Hypertension Appears To Be More Severe Among People With Psoriasis

HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/20, Dallas) reported that, according to a study published online in PLoS One, “people who have psoriasis and hypertension are more likely to have more severe high blood pressure, requiring more medications to control it.” In a study involving 835 patients with both psoriasis and hypertension, plus 2,400 people with just high blood pressure, researchers found that “the patients with psoriasis were more likely to need the highest level of blood pressure treatment, which relies on a central-acting agent (also known as adrenergic inhibitors).” What’s more, “hypertensive patients with psoriasis were also nearly 20 times more likely to be on four drugs or on a central-acting agent than hypertensive patients without psoriasis.”

Prevalence Of Psoriasis Significantly Higher Among Overweight, Obese Children. HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/20, Dallas) reported, “The prevalence of psoriasis…is significantly higher among overweight and obese kids,” according to a study published online in the Journal of Pediatrics. “Using electronic health records to study 710,949 racially and ethnically diverse children, the investigators found obese children were almost 40 percent more likely to have psoriasis than normal weight children.”

“Regardless of body weight, teens with psoriasis had 4% to 16% higher blood cholesterol levels and liver enzymes than teens without psoriasis,” WebMD Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/20, Mann) reported. “Levels of so-called ‘bad’ or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were higher among teens with psoriasis that were also obese.”

 

Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Associated With Autism

HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/11, Goodwin) reported that, according to research presented at the International Meeting for Autism Research, “having the flu during pregnancy isn’t associated with a heightened risk of autism or developmental delay in children, although having a fever during pregnancy might be.” In addition, “giving birth by Cesarean section isn’t associated with autism in offspring, but having diabetes or high blood pressure or being obese while pregnant seems to be.”

In addition, “the mothers of children who were delayed developmentally were about 150% more likely to be obese before pregnancy, have diabetes, or have high blood pressure,” WebMD Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/11, Doheny) reported.

 

Muscular Strength May Be Associated With Reduced Mortality Risk In Men With Hypertension

MedPage Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (4/26, Neale) reported that “hypertensive men with the most muscle strength appear to have a lower risk of dying than their weaker counterparts,” according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Investigators found, “even after controlling for cardiorespiratory fitness level and other potential confounders,” that “men in the upper third of muscle strength were 34% less likely to die during an average follow-up of about 18 years.” The investigators found that “the men with the greatest reduction in mortality risk were those who had the most muscular strength and high fitness.” To view the full JACC article, click here Share to FacebookShare to Twitter

Death Rate Among Americans With Hypertension May Be Declining

HealthDay Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (4/25, Goodwin) reported that “although the death rate among Americans with high blood pressure, or hypertension, has fallen since the 1970s, it still far exceeds the death rate for those with normal blood pressure,” according to a study published in Circulation. Investigators “looked at data on about 23,000 adults aged 25 to 74 from two national health surveys: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I, which recruited participants between 1971 and 1975; and NHANES III, which enrolled adults between 1988 and 1994.” The “death rates among those with high blood pressure fell between the two time periods, from 18.8 per 1,000 person-years to 14.3 per 1,000 person-years.”

WebMD Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (4/25, Nierenberg) reported that the rates were “still higher than in people with normal blood pressure.” The researchers also found that, “among women with high blood pressure, smaller declines in the death rate were found than those seen in men, even though a higher percentage of women were receiving treatment and, on average, they also had larger reductions in their blood pressure readings.”