Tag Archives: diet

6 Strange Dietary Bedfellows

You know, fitness and nutrition guy Jon Benson has a humorous way of putting things that we all need to hear. I received this email from him today and had to share it with you. It’s not only funny, it’s true.

Read on…

What do these six things have in common?

— McDonalds
— Renee Zellweger
— Epileptic children
— Yours truly
— Most bodybuilding and fitness competitors
— Kiefer Sutherland

Give up?

All the above employ the strategies of the low-carb dietplan.

Recently researchers have found that low-carb nutrition plan reduced the number of seizures in epileptic children.

Most of the world’s leanest physiques get that way on a regimen, limited or not, of low-carbs and higher protein.

Even McDonalds is getting into the act.

Even Renee Zellweger.

Even Kiefer Sutherland.

Even me.

Kinda.

Read on and I’ll explain what I mean…

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Why Low-Carb Works

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When McDonalds starts counting carb grams in their food, you know someone is either jumping on a trend or finally seeing the light.

In this case, both — but it is a good thing. Low-carb dietplans. They work.

For the masses, they work because they are the easiest nutrition plan to follow when you’re busy.

McDonalds and stars like Kiefer Sutherland figured this out. The busy on-the-go guy or gal doesn’t want to make the time to prepare six meals per day and carry them around in Tupperware.

When choosing my own lifestyle nutrition plan, time and convenience played a major role. I looked at role models who were very busy, formerly obese, and very lean.

Most of them rely in some form or fashion on a low-carb strategy.

Low-carb also works, much to the hem and haw of traditional doctors and nutritionists, due to the way the body processes fuel.

For those of us fortunate enough to grow up on whole grains and very low-sugar mealplans, a moderate to higher-carb nutrition plan may work just fine.

But most of us grew up eating junk.

Processed foods, fast foods, and downright junk was the cornerstone of our dietplans. That puts your body on the “carb defense.”

After years of abuse the body becomes resistant to carbohydrates. The insulin they produce can cause all sorts of health issues, fat-burning problems, and more.

When carbs are removed, even healthy carbs like whole grains, the body has time to re-adjust.

In some cases, you can go back to a moderate-carb plan with whole grains and fruits after a period of time.

In others, you are a “low-carber” for life.

Guess which one I am?

Finally, low-carb works because you tend to eat less. Fat is very satiating, and most low-carb plans are fairly high in dietaryfat.

So, in recap:

— Easy and convenient;
— Metabolically important for carb recovery;
— Lower in total food volume (eat less)

Do not make light of that first point. Any plan that is not simple is one very few people will stick to. Making your plan simple and tasty is key, even if that plan is not “perfect” by nutritional standards.

Now, by far, the best low-carb dietplan in the world (yes, I’m bias for good reason!) is this:

click.here ——>  http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/eodd

EODD works so well because your carbs are low for “most” of the time. Not “all” of the time. And the times when your carbs are not low you can enjoy your favorite foods.

Personally I enjoy pizza and burgers on my non-low-carb days. You can enjoy whatever you want if you just keep it reasonable.

You see, there’s no need to diet-perfect.

Progress always trumps perfection.

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Why Low-Carb Fails

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There are two primary reasons for the failure of the low-carb nutrition plans: boredom and media bashing.

One causes irritability. The other, doubt. Unless you’re certain that your plan will work, you will eventually go off of it.

This is true of any plan, no matter how ideal it is. Certainty rules.

That’s why I believe in having a flexible, tasty plan like EODD.

Then boredom is easily solved.

I share my own unique ideas about “cycling” carbs and fats in the presentation here:

click.here ——>  http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/eodd

Using my cycle strategy you will rarely if ever become bored. And your body will burn more bodyfat too. It’s just a cheap metabolic trick…but boy, it works.

The second reason is media and medical bias. One study after another has proven that low-carb plans, even the Atkins plan, works and is safe to use for most people.

Check with your doctor first, of course.

I’ve seen researchers get down-right angry when the results come back. In one study, carried out for a full year, the low-carb plan out-performed the so-called “healthy” Dean Ornish plan.

Lower blood fats, more fatloss, and more energy were the results.

My preference always comes back to low-carb nutrition. I just cycle it in a way that allows me to get plenty of veggies, some grains, and ample fiber.

Even a slice of cheesecake here and there… : )

Hey…I said “low-carb”, not “low-life!”

P.S. One of these days the mainstream medical community will wake up to the fact that 90% of the population will never eat 15 servings of veggies per day.

While this may be “optimal”, it’s not at all practical. I’d rather give you down-to- earth practical nutrition advice that you CAN and WILL follow — and enjoy.

Makes sense, doesn’t it?

click.here ——>  http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/eodd

Expert Makes Case That Sugar Is A Toxin

In a lengthy article, Gary Taubes, a Robert Woods Johnson Foundation independent investigator, discusses in the New York Times (4/17, MM47, Taubes, Subscription Publication) claims made by pediatric hormone disorder specialist and childhood obesity expert Robert Lustig, MD, of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine, who makes a “persuasive case…that sugar is a ‘toxin’ or a ‘poison,'” including high-fructose corn syrup. Should Lustig prove to be right, then Americans’ “excessive consumption of sugar is the primary reason that the numbers of obese and diabetic Americans have skyrocketed in the past 30 years,” and the sweet substance “is also the likely dietary cause of several other chronic ailments widely considered to be diseases of Western lifestyles — heart disease, hypertension, and many common cancers among them.”

 

Exercise May Diminish Negative Impact Of High-Salt Diet On Blood Pressure

HealthDay (3/23, Mozes) reported, “Physical activity may diminish the negative impact of a high-salt diet on blood pressure,” according to a study presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association’s conference. For the study, researchers examined data on some 1,900 men and women, all of whom “consumed 3,000 mg of sodium a day in their diet; for another week” and then “were placed on a high-sodium diet — 18,000 mg per day.”
“Researchers also looked at how much physical activity the participants reported on questionnaires,” WebMD (3/23, Goodman) reported. “They found that the more physical activity a person got, the less likely they were to be sensitive to salt.” In fact, “study participants in the group that got the most physical activity had a 38% lower risk of being salt sensitive compared to those who got the least amount of physical activity.”

High-Fiber Diet May Reduce Lifetime Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease


USA Today (3/23, Hellmich) reports, “A high-fiber diet appears to reduce your lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, especially if you are consuming lots of fiber when you are young and middle-aged,” according to a study presented this week at the American Heart Association conference. After analyzing “dietary-recall data from more than 11,000 people, ages 20 and older, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,” researchers found that “people who are in the top 25% of dietary fiber intake — that is, they consume more than 22 grams of dietary fiber a day — are more likely to have a lower lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.” HealthDay (3/22, Dotinga) also covered the story.
Eating Whole Grain Cereal May Reduce Risk For Developing Hypertension. HealthDay (3/22, Reinberg) reported that, according to a study presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association conference, “eating breakfast cereal — especially whole grain cereal — may reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure.” After examining “data on 13,368 male doctors who took part in the Physicians Health Study I,” researchers “found about a 20 percent decreased risk of developing hypertension in those who consumed whole grain breakfasts cereals at least seven times a week.”