Tag Archives: contact lens

Contact Lens Care

Whether you already wear contact lenses or are considering them, this section serves as a primer. Facts and statistics about contact lens wearers, pointers for safe and successful use of contact lenses, and contact lenses and cosmetics are just a few of the topics covered here.

Getting started right with your contact lenses involves going to a doctor who provides full-service care. This includes a thorough eye examination, an evaluation of your suitability for contact lens wear, the lenses, necessary lens care kits, individual instructions for wear and care and unlimited follow-up visits over a specified time.

Recommendations for Contact Lens Wearers from the American Optometric Association

  1. Always wash your hands before handling contact lenses.
  2. Carefully and regularly clean contact lenses, as directed by your optometrist. Rub the contact lenses with fingers and rinse thoroughly before soaking lenses overnight in sufficient multi-purpose solution to completely cover the lens.
  3. Store lenses in the proper lens storage case and replace the case at a minimum of every three months. Clean the case after each use, and keep it open and dry between cleanings.
  4. Use only products recommended by your optometrist to clean and disinfect your lenses. Saline solution and rewetting drops are not designed to disinfect lenses.
  5. Only fresh solution should be used to clean and store contact lenses. Never re-use old solution. Contact lens solution must be changed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, even if the lenses are not used daily.
  6. Always follow the recommended contact lens replacement schedule prescribed by your optometrist.
  7. Remove contact lenses before swimming or entering a hot tub.
  8. See your optometrist for your regularly scheduled contact lens and eye examination.

 

Article Details Options Available For Treating Presbyopia

In “Patient Money,” theĀ New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (4/2, B5, Andrews) discusses presbyopia, a condition that occurs when the “lens of the eye becomes harder and less elastic,” resulting in “a gradual worsening of the ability to focus on objects up close” for those over 40. Having presbyopia is “‘like having a camera with no multifocal option,’ said Dr. Rachel J. Bishop, chief of the consult services section of the National Eye Institute.” The article explains various options for correcting the condition, including reading glasses, bifocal or multi-focal contact lenses, and progressive bifocals. TheĀ New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (4/1, Parker-Pope) “Well” blog also covered the story.