Op-Ed Attributes Rapid Increase In Nearsightedness To Spending Time Indoors

In an op-ed in theĀ New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, A27, Subscription Publication), Sandra Aamodt, a former editor in chief of Nature Neuroscience, and Sam Wang, an associate professor of molecular biology and neuroscience at Princeton University, wrote that “the rapid increase in nearsightedness appears to be due to a characteristic of modern life: more and more time spent indoors under artificial lights.” Scientists now “suspect that bright outdoor light helps children’s developing eyes maintain the correct distance between the lens and the retina — which keeps vision in focus. Dim indoor lighting doesn’t seem to provide the same kind of feedback.” Therefore, “when children spend too many hours inside, their eyes fail to grow correctly and the distance between the lens and retina becomes too long, causing far-away objects to look blurry.”

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