Eating Fish, Shellfish May Reduce Risk For Diabetes

MedWire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, Ford) reported, “Analysis of data from over 100,000 individuals in China has shown that eating fish and shellfish significantly reduces the risk for developing diabetes,” according to a study Share to FacebookShare to Twitter published online June 15 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. After evaluating “data collected from 51,963 men aged 40-74 years and 64,193 women aged 40-70 years,” all of whom were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or type 2 diabetes at study start and who were followed for about nine years, researchers found that “increased intake of fish, shellfish, and long-chain n-3 fatty acids was associated with a significantly decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in women. In men, only shellfish intake predicted a significantly decreased risk for diabetes.”

Op-Ed Attributes Rapid Increase In Nearsightedness To Spending Time Indoors

In an op-ed in the New York Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (6/21, A27, Subscription Publication), Sandra Aamodt, a former editor in chief of Nature Neuroscience, and Sam Wang, an associate professor of molecular biology and neuroscience at Princeton University, wrote that “the rapid increase in nearsightedness appears to be due to a characteristic of modern life: more and more time spent indoors under artificial lights.” Scientists now “suspect that bright outdoor light helps children’s developing eyes maintain the correct distance between the lens and the retina — which keeps vision in focus. Dim indoor lighting doesn’t seem to provide the same kind of feedback.” Therefore, “when children spend too many hours inside, their eyes fail to grow correctly and the distance between the lens and retina becomes too long, causing far-away objects to look blurry.”