Diabetic Retinopathy May Predict All-Cause Mortality, Cardiovascular Disease In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

MedWire Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/6, Albert) reported that, according to a meta-analysis Share to FacebookShare to Twitter published April 27 in the journal Diabetes Care, “diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a predictor for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.” The meta-analysis, which encompassed 20 studies including 19,234 participants, found that, “compared with patients with type 2 diabetes and no DR, those with any degree of DR had a significant 2.34-fold increased risk for the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and/or CVD (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, coronary artery bypass graft, ischemic changes on electrocardiography, stroke, or lower leg amputation).”

VEGF Inhibitor Shows Promise For Treating Neovascular AMD

Medscape Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (5/6, Osterweil) reported that, according to a study presented at a vision research meeting, “An experimental fusion protein was safe and was associated with statistically significant improvements in visual acuity and other parameters, compared with sham injections, in patients with macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion, and also showed efficacy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).” Specifically, “six-month follow-up results from the phase 3 COPERNICUS (Controlled Phase 3 Evaluation of Repeated Intravitreal Administration of VEGF Trap-Eye In Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: Utility and Safety) trial showed that 56.1% of patients who received the protein gained at least three lines of visual acuity (15 or more letters), compared with 12.3% of control subjects who received sham injections (P < .0001).”

How Long To Rest Between Sets

[ Editor’s Note:  Fitness author Jon Benson shared this letter with me and gave me permission to share it with you. ]

A lot of my readers ask me how long to rest between sets while exercising.

The answer is: It depends on your goals.

If you are training to increase strength, I recommend resting a bit longer – up to two minutes for exercises like squats and heavy dumbbell work. But if you want to burn the most amount of bodyfat and gain lean muscle, I recommend resting for very short periods of time.

“The Iron Guru” Vince Gironda used to recommend leaving your hands on the bar between sets — now THAT is short rest intervals!  He would frequently rest only 15-20 seconds between sets.

This is similar to the strategy I use in 7 Minute Muscle — very short rest intervals and very intense training. Smart, short, efficient. That’s the way to go.

A good place to start is simply reducing your rest intervals by 10 seconds. No matter what workout you’re using, decrease your rest by 10 seconds between sets. You may not be as strong on the last few sets (if you are training traditionally… if you use 7 Minute Muscle your rest is “built-in” and not an issue.) Over time you will work your way back up to the same amount of sets and reps but done in far less time.

This means more work output, which means more muscle if your nutrition is good.

This is the best way to train most of the time:  Limited rest, intense sets, and short workouts.

They are the ones that produce results.

Go here for more information —

http://www.jonbensonfitness.com/go/kdtruong/7mm<— Short, effective workouts